Sunday, December 31, 2017

2017 Year in Review - 12/31/17

December 31, 2017-- Happy New Year!  With all the traveling we've done this year, I still managed to complete a few projects shown below.  Click on the caption of each photo for more details.  
2018 promises to be as much fun if not more than 2017 with lots of new projects.  On the agenda are trips to Southern California, Oregon State, Arizona State, ANG Seminar in Washington, DC, a class in February in Maryland (Toni Gerdes' Fire & Ice ), a stitching retreat to Winterthur in Wilmington, Delaware in March, another stitching retreat in Ocean City, MD.   Lots to keep me excited and engaged in this wonderful passion.


Rozashi Baby Iris

Rozashi Imari Sampler



Trimming the Tree Ornament


ANG Distance Learning Correspondence Course Chair Name Tag

Holiday Gift Blue Ornament

Holiday Light Copper Ornament

Holiday Brass Bell Ornament

Shades of Christmas Poinsettia Ornament

Holiday Gift Copper Ornament

Nutcracker Santa

Faberge's Jeweled Spiral Coil Egg

Star in the Meadow Stocking

American Beauty Rose

SOTM 2016 









Saturday, December 30, 2017

Rehoboth Beach, DE Needlework Exhibit - 12/30/17

December 30, 2017--News:  the Needlework Exhibit in Rehoboth Beach, DE will be held in September/October of 2018.
The museum's director recently wrote....."As many of you know, the Historical Society, which operates the museum, has been raising money to complete construction on the second floor. We have finally raised enough money to begin construction and we will do so beginning January 2, 2018. Construction will continue through at least the end of April, 2018. This means that the Needlework exhibit will not be held at its regular time in 2018. We will hold the exhibit in September and October of next year. This would mean drop-off dates of mid-to-late August, and opening the weekend of either Labor Day or the week after, and a pick-up the last weekend of October. One benefit of this time frame is that it moves the exhibit farther away from the Woodlawn exhibit, and gives the exhibit the chance to be seen by more visitors."
This is good news for those who participate in both exhibits (Woodlawn and Rehoboth Beach) and about the museum's 2nd floor construction. Actual exhibit dates will be published once they are known.
Rehoboth Beach, DE Museum


Thursday, December 7, 2017

Rozashi Baby Iris - 12/7/17

December 7, 2017--This little Rozashi Study called Baby Iris by Margaret Kinsey was a CyberPointers class in 2013.  I ordered the kit, then put it aside, not comfortable with the style and method.   Well, that problem ended after completing the recent Rozashi Imari Study class, a recent CyberPointers offering.  I was able to stitch this up in a few days and really like the technique using all vertical stitches on a Japanese canvas called "ro".

The next step is to block the piece by spreading a thin layer of Yamato nori stitcking paste (a type of glue) all over the stitches in the back, then while still damp after an hour, hold an iron above the canvas and steam the devil out of it until it is dried, then do it all over again.  At least that's how I interpret the instructions.  Once that's done, I'll make a little egg shaped ornament out of it and hang it on a drawer knob in my dressing closet.

I found some rozashi projects in the 2005, 2006 and 2009 NeedlePointers Magazine, so will have to find a source for "ro" canvas and work on those.

Rozashi Baby Iris Completed Closeup

Rozashi Baby Iris Completed


Sunday, December 3, 2017

A Study in Rozashi--A Petite Sampler - Updated 12/3/17

December 3, 2017--Finished lessons 3, 4 and 5, completing all the stitching.  These sections are called Kaku (upper left), Tortoise Variation (upper middle) and a pattern with no name (lower right).  Margaret advised us to be frugal with the use of the kitted threads since we could run out if mistakes were constantly made.  Well, I took that advise to heart and was careful to place the stitches correctly.  In the end there was plenty of thread left.  Of course, there were mistakes that had to be ripped out, but fortunately, they were small ones. 

Rozashi consists of vertical stitches over horizontal threads and I found this type of work to go very quickly.  Will now look for similar projects using this method.

This will make a lovely framed picture for my in-home office.

Rozashi Imari Sampler Completed Closeup

Rozashi Imari Sampler Completed
November 29, 2017--Lesson 2 for sections called Tortoise and Daiya is now done.  More challenges with all the compensation that's needed.  Still enjoying this project.  Working on such a small canvas, however, does require good magnification.  Glad for my mageyes.  It's also a good thing that this is worked "in the well" so to speak (canvas is attached in back of the wood holder).  I'm stitching right to the edge of the wood and it's easy to end threads on the back because there's nothing in my way.

Rozashi Imari Study Lesson 2 Tortoise and Daiya Closeup

Rozashi Imari Study Lesson 2 Tortoise and Daiya

November 27, 2017--Lesson 1, section called Diamond Flower, is done.  This was a bigger challenge than expected.  Margaret Kinsey instructed us to stitch in a diagonal direction when working the light peach area.  Because of all the compensation stitches, I found that hard to manage, so I stitched along the horizontal line.  I don't think it changed the appearance that much.

Love the shine of the silk threads.

Rozashi Imari Sampler through Lesson 1 Diamond Flower Closeup

Rozashi Imari Sampler through Lesson 1 Diamond Flower


November 12, 2017--Last June I signed up to take this class through ANG's online chapter called CyberPointers.  The lessons were held during the chapter's November meeting and I'm loving it.  I'm still working on Lesson 1, but can see how beautiful this little sampler is going to be.

The working surface is very different from the mono canvases to which we're accustomed.  Rozashi stitching is done on starched silk gauze material called a "ro".  There are 3 horizontal threads, called "dan" that are woven very close together and are considered as one thread for stitching.  This causes an elongated vertical stitch.  A very pretty effect.  The "ro" is glued to a thin wood frame and all stitching is done "in hand"--no floor or table stands needed, at least not for a project this small.  And the twisted silk threads are scrumptious.  They reflect so much light.

I'm even learning to count up to three in Japanese.  Ichi is one, ni is two and san is three.  This count is important as all stitches are done over ichi, ni or san dan.    Margaret Kinsey's instruction booklet is wonderful and the added lessons through CyberPointers are very helpful.

Here's what I've done so far.

Rozashi Imari Sampler through 11/12/17

Closeup of the "dan" row of a "ro" canvas